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Access Type

WSU Access

Date of Award

January 2020

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Educational Leadership and Policy

First Advisor

William Hill

Abstract

Abstract

The Social Cognitive Career Theory was applied to examine how the desire to coach or administrate are impacted by self-efficacy, occupational valence, perceived hindrance, and role model influence. This study was conducted to address the underrepresentation of females in collegiate sports leadership positions. The study examined if being coached by males or if males in leadership positions is preferred. Women coach less than half, (40.2%) of women’s sports and women account for 19.6% percent of administrators in college athletic departments. Hypothetically, the results of this study will support and enhance the NCAA college sports model by revealing quantitative data that provide a foundation for understanding the problems and identifying key factors important to the leadership development of female student-athletes. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, MANOVAs, and path analysis. Everhart and Chelladurai (1998) stated that female athletes preferred male coaches and that female athletes that had male coaches were more likely to perceive discrimination as a barrier. The study’s finding is that collegiate female student-athletes had a high perception of female coaches and female administrators and a preference for female coaches.

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