Document Type

Article

Abstract

We advance scholarship related to home foreclosures and neighborhood crime by employing Granger causality tests and multilevel growth modeling with annual data from Chicago neighborhoods over the 1998-2009 period. We find that completed foreclosures temporally lead property crime and not vice versa. More completed foreclosures during a year both increase the level of property crime and slow its decline subsequently. This relationship is strongest in higher-income, predominantly renter-occupied neighborhoods, contrary to the conventional wisdom. We did not find unambiguous, uni-directional causation in the case of violent crime and when filed foreclosures were analyzed.

Disciplines

Criminology | Public Policy | Social Policy | Urban Studies | Urban Studies and Planning

Comments

NOTICE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLISHER POLICY: This is the authors’ accepted manuscript version of an article subsequently published in Housing Studies 29(3), 2014, pp. 380-406, available online at http://www.tandfonline.com/ 10.1080/02673037.2013.803041. This version has been formatted for archiving.