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Access Type

WSU Access

Date of Award

1-1-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.S.

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

First Advisor

Cheng-Zhong Xu

Abstract

The current consensus of the definition of the "cloud" is the combination of hardware and software provided remotely as a service. One of the biggest and potentially most consequential questions related to the cloud is how mobile devices can access and tap into this vast resource. As these devices become smaller and smaller, consumers are conversely demanding more functionality and features. Bridging the gap between high-end servers and mobile devices could solve the computing problem. This research focuses on providing an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), which remotely provides both the physical hardware and platform needed to run applications. Both an overview of current cloud providers and mobile cloud systems are discussed. Additionally, a few small scale implementations of cloud computing were tested in order to gain quantitative data about the viability of cloud computing. These include computationally intensive benchmark tests dynamically offloaded to a remote server using Java RMI and a chess game Android application that connects to the Google App Engine, which executes the chess game engine remotely. Through analysis of the current state-of-the-art and the test applications, the advantages and limitations of cloud computing are measured and quantified.