Access Type

Open Access Dissertation

Date of Award

January 2016

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Educational Leadership and Policy

First Advisor

Thomas G. Edwards

Abstract

ABSTRACT

THE IMPACT OF CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS AND COLLABORATIVE FEEDBACK ON EVALUATION OF TEACHER PERFORMANCE, BASED ON THE DANIELSON FRAMEWORK FOR TEACHING

by

CHRISTINE L. HOFER

December 2016

Advisor: Dr. Thomas Edwards

Major: Education

Degree: Doctor of Philosophy

Teacher evaluation systems in Michigan are undergoing major reforms driven by recent legislation at both the federal and state levels. Multiple teacher observations, as well as student achievement data, are now required to be a major indicator of teacher effectiveness for evaluative purposes. The reformed system is high-stakes, as employment decisions such as layoffs and termination rest squarely on evaluation results. Implementation has been fast, and school districts throughout the state are working to understand the new requirements, and to implement them fairly and with fidelity. Many districts are utilizing Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching (2007) as a rubric to measure teacher quality against components of effective teaching. This study begins by contrasting the ideals and beliefs behind the push for teacher accountability to the viewpoints of educational leaders and current research on best practices in education. Analysis of a school district that has implemented Danielson’s Framework for Teaching for four years will be will be used to determine the impact it has had on teacher performance. A vital component of the process involves feedback conversations. The elements of collaboration that are linked to improvement in teacher performance are examined, and some of the barriers to implementing a successful system are identified.

Keywords: evaluation, teacher, Michigan, union, reform, education, best practices, effective teaching, coaching, classroom observations, Framework for Teaching