Location

McGregor Room J

Start Date

25-9-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

25-9-2014 10:30 AM

Description

This panel will explore the link between today’s small press movement and the formal aspects of commercial printing during the American 20th century. Panelists include Christine Medley , Philip Gattuso, and Nancy Bernardo.

Using as its primary example letterhead from defunct companies in Detroit, and secondarily, specimens of business and legal letterhead from other urban centers of the industrial United States, this panel will examine and discuss: What did letterhead represent to 20th century printers in local markets such as Detroit? What is the significance of printed letterhead, and stationery, to the art of small press printing in post-industrial cities in the U.S. today?

Relying upon specimens from the following institutions, this panel will compare the aesthetics of contemporary small press printing with technological, artistic, and functional practices in 20th century trade printing: Center for Abandoned Letterhead, and Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs, Detroit; Benson Ford Research Center, Dearborn, Michigan; The Cranbrook Archives, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; Greenfield/Belser, Ltd, Legal Letterhead research project, Washington, D.C.; McIlhenny Archives, Avery Island, Louisiana; and Gerald Cannon collection, Auburn, Alabama.

Attendees to this panel would take-away a new appreciation for how the simple act of providing printing services, in the form of business letterhead, informed printing styles in the last century, and how that relates to small press printing today.

Comments

Examples of 20th century commercially printed lettterhead is attached.

As time permits, this panel may also compare the visual influences of the artistic printing movement of the early 20th century with contemporary small press printing referencing The Rise and Fall of the Printers’ International Specimen Exchange (Matthew McLennan Young, 2012; Oak Knoll Press) and The Handy Book of Artistic Printing: Collection of Letterpress Examples with Specimens of Type, Ornament, Corner Fills, Borders, Twisters, Wrinklers (Doug Clouse and Angela Voulangas, 2009; Princeton Architectural Press).

Associated links:

http://dittoditto.org/shop/center-for-abandoned-letterhead-catalog http://www.reuther.wayne.edu/ http://www.thehenryford.org/research/index_old.aspx http://www.cranbrook.edu/center/archives http://www.oakknoll.com/pages/books/108704/matthew-mclennan-young/rise-and-fall-of-the-printers-international-specimen-exchange-the http://www.papress.com/html/book.details.page.tpl?isbn=9781568987057

 
Sep 25th, 9:00 AM Sep 25th, 10:30 AM

Salvaging Print: Letterhead in Post-Industrial Urban America

McGregor Room J

This panel will explore the link between today’s small press movement and the formal aspects of commercial printing during the American 20th century. Panelists include Christine Medley , Philip Gattuso, and Nancy Bernardo.

Using as its primary example letterhead from defunct companies in Detroit, and secondarily, specimens of business and legal letterhead from other urban centers of the industrial United States, this panel will examine and discuss: What did letterhead represent to 20th century printers in local markets such as Detroit? What is the significance of printed letterhead, and stationery, to the art of small press printing in post-industrial cities in the U.S. today?

Relying upon specimens from the following institutions, this panel will compare the aesthetics of contemporary small press printing with technological, artistic, and functional practices in 20th century trade printing: Center for Abandoned Letterhead, and Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs, Detroit; Benson Ford Research Center, Dearborn, Michigan; The Cranbrook Archives, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; Greenfield/Belser, Ltd, Legal Letterhead research project, Washington, D.C.; McIlhenny Archives, Avery Island, Louisiana; and Gerald Cannon collection, Auburn, Alabama.

Attendees to this panel would take-away a new appreciation for how the simple act of providing printing services, in the form of business letterhead, informed printing styles in the last century, and how that relates to small press printing today.