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Executive Editor

Brian M. Kemp, Washington State University, USA

Brian M. Kemp is a molecular anthropologist with an expertise in the field of ancient human genetics. He earned his PhD in Anthropology in 2006 from the University of California-Davis and has been jointly appointed in the Department of Anthropology and the School of Biological Sciences at WSU since the fall of 2007. He studies genetic variation in extant and prehistoric Native American populations to address questions about their population prehistory that are not approachable from culture history alone. Another major focus of his research has been in evaluating and improving methods for the recovery of genetic data from ancient human and animal remains, which has direct applicability to forensic science as well.

Executive Editor

Ripan S. Malhi, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA

Ripan S. Malhi is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, School of Integrative Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He is a molecular anthropologist who collaborates with indigenous communities to study the evolutionary histories of Native Americans. He also organizes the Summer Internship for Native Americans in Genomics (SING), a workshop for indigenous students to learn innovative concepts and methods in the life sciences.

Assistant Editor

John Lindo, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA

John Lindo is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His dissertation centers around ancient human adaptations to changing environments from a genomic perspective, with a special focus on pathogen-host interactions.

Associate Editor

Maria Cátira Bortolini, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Associate Editor

Graciela Cabana, University of Tennessee, USA

Graciela Cabana is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her work explores the intersections of behavioral, morphological, and genetic phenomena in past and present human demography. Her specific research interests include migration theory, ancient DNA studies in bioarchaeological contexts, as well as the current social and ethical impact of genetics and genomics.

Associate Editor

Murray Cox, Massey University, New Zealand

Murray P. Cox is Associate Professor of Computational Biology at Massey University, New Zealand. He has particular interest in modeling genome dynamics – establishing how genetic variation is distributed within and between individual genomes, and determining how this diversity changes over evolutionary time. Drawing heavily on statistics and computer science with a solid foundation in genetics and anthropology, he designs and implements novel algorithms, largely in the fields of coalescent theory, demographic inference and high-throughput sequencing. He is currently applying these tools to reconstruct aspects of human prehistory, especially linking global patterns of diversity to the evolutionary dynamics of small communities.

Associate Editor

Yinqiu Cui, Jilin University, China

Yinqiu Cui is a molecular biologist with an emphasis on ancient DNA and forensic anthropology. She received her Ph.D. from Jilin University in 2002 and joined the faculty at the college of life science, Jilin University in August of 2003. Her research interests include reconstructing genetic structure of ancient populations and molecular forensic anthropology, such as sex identification, kinship reconstruction, and individual identification. Previous and on-going projects involve the whole mitochondrial genome study of a prehistoric Xinjiang population using next generation sequencing technique, DNA identification of archaeological human remains, and forensic species identification of degraded biological samples.

Associate Editor

Rolando González-José, Centro Nacional Patagónico-CONICET, Argentina

Rolando González-José is a biological anthropologist working as researcher and Director of the National Patagonian Centre, CENPAT-CONICET (Argentina). He earned his PhD in Biology in 2003 from the University of Barcelona (Spain). His research interests concern the patterns and processes underlying Hominid craniofacial variation and evolution. In particular, he has devoted their efforts to explore the dynamics of the New World’s settlement, and how the evidences coming from different fields like molecular genetics, archaeology, skeletal biology and linguistics can contribute to a synthetic, interdisciplinary view of such a complex historical process. Also, he participates in the CANDELA (Consortium for the Analysis of the Diversity and Evolution of Latin America), an international, multidisciplinary initiative involving academic researchers studying the biological diversity of modern Latin Americans and its social context. CANDELA aims to explore both, the genetic basis of some external phenotypes, including craniofacial traits, and the complex relationship between social and biological factors impinging on ideas about ethnic identity.

Associate Editor

Keith Hunley, University of New Mexico, USA

Keith Hunley is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. He earned his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2002. His research in genetic anthropology seeks to improve our understanding of the evolutionary processes that have molded human biological and cultural diversity at different times and places in the past. His specific interests include human origins and prehistory, genetic and linguistic co-evolution in the Americas and Island Melanesia, and ethnicity and health in New Mexico.

Associate Editor

Cecil M. Lewis, Jr., University of Oklahoma, USA

Cecil M. Lewis, Jr. is a molecular anthropologists specializing in population genetics and human microbiome research. He earned his PhD in anthropology in 2005 from the University of New Mexico and conducted postdoctoral studies at the University of Michigan Medical School. Currently, Dr. Lewis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma.

Associate Editor

Heather L. Norton, University of Cincinnati, USA

Heather Norton is a molecular anthropologist who explores the role of natural selection in shaping modern human phenotypic and genetic diversity. She earned her PhD in Anthropology from The Pennsylvania State University in 2005 and joined Department of Anthropology at the University of Cincinnati in 2010. Her work primarily focuses on the role of natural selection in impacting variation of the skin, hair and eyes in human populations. In her research she explores methods to quantify these complex phenotypes, identify genetic variants responsible for observed patterns of diversity, and identify loci targeted by natural selection.

Associate Editor

Charles C. Roseman, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA

Associate Editor

Noah A. Rosenberg, Stanford University, USA