Date of Award

Winter 5-5-2016

Degree Type

Dissertation/Thesis

Degree Name

B.S.

Department

Mathematics

Faculty Advisor

Daniel Frohardt

Abstract

This paper analyzes the fielding data surrounding two players in Major League Baseball whose Rawlings Gold Glove award wins were viewed as controversial or undeserved. Derek Jeter’s Gold Glove win at shortstop in 2010 and Rafael Palmeiro’s win at first base in 1999 caused players, managers, and sports writers to question the managers who voted for those players in those years. This paper analyzes shortstops in the American League who played during the career of Jeter and first basemen in the American league who played during the career of Palmeiro. It uses some of the fielding statistics of those players to establish a scoring system that managers and coaches can use when deciding how to cast their votes for the Gold Glove award. First, the number of games and innings each player took part in during a season is used to determine whether a player is qualified for the Gold Glove award (based on Rawlings’ own qualifications). The analysis takes into account the players’ fielding percentages and the numbers of errors and assists made during a season. Using these statistics, a scoring system is then developed that can be used to determine whether the player who won the Gold Glove in a particular year was deserving of the votes he received. Also included is a suggestion of other players who could have won the award in that year.

Comments

This paper analyzes the fielding data surrounding two players in Major League Baseball whose Rawlings Gold Glove award wins were viewed as controversial or undeserved. Derek Jeter’s Gold Glove win at shortstop in 2010 and Rafael Palmeiro’s win at first base in 1999 caused players, managers, and sports writers to question the managers who voted for those players in those years. This paper analyzes shortstops in the American League who played during the career of Jeter and first basemen in the American league who played during the career of Palmeiro. It uses some of the fielding statistics of those players to establish a scoring system that managers and coaches can use when deciding how to cast their votes for the Gold Glove award. First, the number of games and innings each player took part in during a season is used to determine whether a player is qualified for the Gold Glove award (based on Rawlings’ own qualifications). The analysis takes into account the players’ fielding percentages and the numbers of errors and assists made during a season. Using these statistics, a scoring system is then developed that can be used to determine whether the player who won the Gold Glove in a particular year was deserving of the votes he received. Also included is a suggestion of other players who could have won the award in that year.

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